Game #938

1912-13

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Position:

Final

FA Cup Final

Sunderland

Crystal Palace, London

Attendance: 121,919

Saturday, 19 April 1913

Villa win the FA Cup for the fifth time against a bad tempered Sunderland side.

Aston Villa

1-0

Sunderland

Scorer(s) | Tommy Barber | 78' |

Assist(s) | Not recorded

AT A GLANCE

Game #938

Season | 1912-13 |
Matchday | #41 |
Manager Game | #912 |
Saturday, 19 April 1913

MATCH SUMMARY

Manager | George Ramsay led Management Committee |
Referee | Arthur Adams, Nottinghamshire |
HT Score | 0-0 |
FT Score | 1-0 |
FT Result | Won |
Last 5 Games | WLDWW |

MATCH OFFICIALS

MATCH INCIDENTS

Villa

Sunderland

🟨 | Booking
🟥 | Sending off
💥+ | Incidents e.g. penalty awarded

💥- | Incidents e.g. penalty conceded, goal disallowed

💥 | Incidents e.g. refused clear pen

🆘 | Notably poor refereeing performance    

TEAM STATS

Not recorded

TEAM NEWS

Jim Harrop, Jimmy Leach, Tommy Weston and Harold Halse replace Freddie Miles, Bill Morris, George Tranter and Andy McLachlan for the FA Cup final.

UNAVAILABLE

Not recorded

MATCH STATS

Not recorded

MANAGER

Management Committee | Club Secretary | George Ramsay

STAFF

STARTING LINE UP

GK Sam Hardy |
FB Tom Lyons |
CB Jim Harrop |
LB Tommy Weston |
M Jimmy Leach |
M Tommy Barber |
W Charlie Wallace |
F Joe Bache |
F Clem Stephenson |
F Harold Halse |
CF Harry Hampton |

SUBSTITUTES

No Substitutions permitted in period

UNUSED SUBSTITUTES

No Substitutions permitted in period

THE OPPOSITION

Opposition | Joe Butler | Charlie Gladwin | Harry Ness | Francis Cuggy | Charlie Thomson | Harry Low | Jackie Mordue | Charlie Buchan | Jimmy Richardson | George Holley | Henry Martin |

Manager | Bob Kyle

ex: Also played for the Villa

g: Scored

s/o: Sent off

s-: Sub off; s+: Sub on

ON THIS DAY

Villa and Sunderland contest the FA Cup final with Villa victorious for the fifth time in a match notable for two reasons.

This was the first time that the top two League teams would face off in the final - with the eventual champions not to be settled until the next set of fixtures - and this was the most bad tempered final that football had seen as a thuggish Sunderland side betrayed their quality with questionable tactics.

Both teams would meet the following week in a title decider perhaps hoping for a reaction to their advantage.

Tommy Barber scored on 78' to win Villa their fifth FA Cup in the most bad tempered final of all time, Saturday, 19 April 1913.

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MATCH TIMELINE

MANAGER WATCH

POSITION

2021-22 Matchweek 38.jpg

MATCH PROGRAMME

MATCH PROGRAMME

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QUOTES

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Villa’s Clem Stephenson had dreamt the night before that Villa would win the Cup and that Tommy Barber would head the all-important goal. He revealed his premonition to Sunderland’s Charlie Buchan during the match, and was pushed aside. “/Ah, get away with you/,” Buchan was said to have replied.

Almost from kick off Harry Hampton, Villa’s superstar centre forward began a running battle with Sunderland’s Scottish centre half Charlie Thomson, indeed such was Sunderland’s rough edges to their play that they were later refused entry into the following season’s Charity Shield.

That wasn’t to be the only punishment following the match - referee Adams was suspended for allowing a scarcely believable 17 minutes of added time at the end of 90 minutes as Sunderland searched for an equaliser. Harry Hampton didn’t escape punishment either, receiving a suspension for his part in the ongoing melee that became a feature of the game.

Indeed the referee had occasion to lecture him six times during the match and the denouement was a second half incident which saw punches thrown.

On the pitch - with the ball - things were almost as ugly.

Tommy Barber, Jimmy Harrop and Jimmy Leach did a superb job of shackling Sunderland’s front line but likewise Harry Hampton, Harold Halse and Joe Bache could find no way past troublemaker Thomson and his fellow bricks in Sunderland’s defensive wall Gladwin and Low.

That said Villa should have taken the lead in the 15th minute after Sunderland’s rough housing saw Gladwin penalised for a heavy challenge on Clem Stephenson. The resulting penalty was placed well wide by Charlie Wallace so the scores remained level at 0-0 going into half time.

Further consequences were felt from Sunderland’s foul play as Villa’s goalkeeper Sam Hardy suffered an injured knee in one particularly robust challenge and was forced to leave the field of play for seven minutes.

The game however continued with Villa playing without a goalkeeper as Jimmy Harrop stood in for Sam until he was able to return. Unsurprisingly, with Harry Hampton helping out with defensive duties, Sunderland took the upper hand in this short period, peppering the novice keeper with crosses. Jimmy stood tall however and Sunderland failed to get any reward for their approach.

Although Sam Hardy was still clearly injured he returned to enable Villa to revert to their original formation and in doing so the game’s momentum swung back to Villa and it was no surprise when Villa took the lead.

From a corner Charlie Wallace sent the ball into the box towards Tommy Barber who was standing a yard outside the penalty-area. He darted forward, got his head to the ball, and sent it skidding past the unsighted Butler in the Sunderland goal.

Yet despite the controversy and provocation Villa held their nerve and clinched their fifth FA Cup win.

Not only had Villa won the cup but Clem Stephenson’s dream had come true.

The Final itself lasted for 107 minutes, an excessive amount of injury time being added by the soon to be censured referee, even taking into account the on pitch treatment for Sam Hardy.

Villa’s Clem Stephenson had dreamt the night before that Villa would win the Cup and that Tommy Barber would head the all-important goal. He revealed his premonition to Sunderland’s Charlie Buchan during the match, and was pushed aside. “/Ah, get away with you/,” Buchan was said to have replied.

Almost from kick off Harry Hampton, Villa’s superstar centre forward began a running battle with Sunderland’s Scottish centre half Charlie Thomson, indeed such was Sunderland’s rough edges to their play that they were later refused entry into the following season’s Charity Shield.

That wasn’t to be the only punishment following the match - referee Adams was suspended for allowing a scarcely believable 17 minutes of added time at the end of 90 minutes as Sunderland searched for an equaliser. Harry Hampton didn’t escape punishment either, receiving a suspension for his part in the ongoing melee that became a feature of the game.

Indeed the referee had occasion to lecture him six times during the match and the denouement was a second half incident which saw punches thrown.

On the pitch - with the ball - things were almost as ugly.

Tommy Barber, Jimmy Harrop and Jimmy Leach did a superb job of shackling Sunderland’s front line but likewise Harry Hampton, Harold Halse and Joe Bache could find no way past troublemaker Thomson and his fellow bricks in Sunderland’s defensive wall Gladwin and Low.

That said Villa should have taken the lead in the 15th minute after Sunderland’s rough housing saw Gladwin penalised for a heavy challenge on Clem Stephenson. The resulting penalty was placed well wide by Charlie Wallace so the scores remained level at 0-0 going into half time.

Further consequences were felt from Sunderland’s foul play as Villa’s goalkeeper Sam Hardy suffered an injured knee in one particularly robust challenge and was forced to leave the field of play for seven minutes.

The game however continued with Villa playing without a goalkeeper as Jimmy Harrop stood in for Sam until he was able to return. Unsurprisingly, with Harry Hampton helping out with defensive duties, Sunderland took the upper hand in this short period, peppering the novice keeper with crosses. Jimmy stood tall however and Sunderland failed to get any reward for their approach.

Although Sam Hardy was still clearly injured he returned to enable Villa to revert to their original formation and in doing so the game’s momentum swung back to Villa and it was no surprise when Villa took the lead.

From a corner Charlie Wallace sent the ball into the box towards Tommy Barber who was standing a yard outside the penalty-area. He darted forward, got his head to the ball, and sent it skidding past the unsighted Butler in the Sunderland goal.

Yet despite the controversy and provocation Villa held their nerve and clinched their fifth FA Cup win.

Not only had Villa won the cup but Clem Stephenson’s dream had come true.

The Final itself lasted for 107 minutes, an excessive amount of injury time being added by the soon to be censured referee, even taking into account the on pitch treatment for Sam Hardy.