Game #4621

1999-00

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Position:

7th= (-1)

Premier League

Liverpool

Villa Park

Attendance: 39,217

Saturday, 2 October 1999

Villa are held by ten man Liverpool at Villa park as the returning Steve Staunton is sent off.

Aston Villa

0-0

Liverpool

Scorer(s) | None |

Assist(s) | None

AT A GLANCE

Game #4621

Season | 1999-00 |
Matchday | #12 |
League Game | #10 |
Manager Game | #70 |
Saturday, 2 October 1999

MATCH SUMMARY

Manager | John Gregory |
Referee | Rob Harris, Oxford |
FT Result | Drew |
FT Score | 0-0 |
Last 5 Games | WWWLD |

MATCH OFFICIALS

Referee: Rob Harris

MATCH INCIDENTS

Rob Harris

Villa

🟨 | 🟨 | 🟨 |

Liverpool

🟥 | 🟨 | 🟨 | 🟨 | 🟨 | 🟨 |

🟨 | Booking
🟥 | Sending off
💥+ | Incidents e.g. penalty awarded

💥- | Incidents e.g. penalty conceded, goal disallowed

💥 | Incidents e.g. refused clear pen

🆘 | Notably poor refereeing performance    

TEAM STATS

Starting XI Average Age
| 25.43 |

Oldest Player |
M Ian Taylor | 31.35 |

Youngest Player |
M Gareth Barry | 18.62 |

TEAM NEWS

Mark Delaney returns after a four game absence with Steve Watson dropping out.

UNAVAILABLE

Not recorded

MATCH STATS

Not recorded

MANAGER

John Gregory

STAFF

Assistant Manager: John Deehan

STARTING LINE UP

GK Peter Enckelman |
FB Mark Delaney |
CB Gareth Southgate |
CB Ugo Ehiogu |
M Gareth Barry |
M George Boateng |
M Lee Hendrie |
M Ian Taylor |
M Alan Thompson |
CF Dion Dublin |
F Julian Joachim |

SUBSTITUTES

M Paul Merson for M George Boateng | 67’ |
M Steve Stone for M Lee Hendrie | 80’ |

UNUSED SUBSTITUTES

CB Colin Calderwood
GK Michael Oakes
FB Steve Watson

THE OPPOSITION

Westerveld, Staunton (ex) (s/o), Henchoz, Song, Hyypiä, Šmicer (Gerrard), Redknapp, Berger (ex), Hamann (Carragher), Owen (Camara), Meijer. Manager: Gérard Houllier.

ex: Also played for the Villa

g: Scored

s/o: Sent off

s-: Sub off; s+: Sub on

ON THIS DAY

The unpopular Steve Staunton was sent off on his return to Villa Park, cue rapturous hilarity.

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MATCH TIMELINE

31’ Sending off, Steve Staunton
HT Aston Villa 0-0 Liverpool
67’ Sub off, George Boateng, Sub on, Paul Merson
80’ Sub off, Lee Hendrie, Sub on, Steve Stone
Booking, Gareth Barry
Booking, George Boateng
Booking, Alan Thompson
FT Aston Villa 0-0 Liverpool

MANAGER WATCH

POSITION

2021-22 Matchweek 38.jpg

MATCH PROGRAMME

MATCH PROGRAMME

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QUOTES

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Click image for match VIDEO CONTENT brought to you by VILLA BOY

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*The Guardian*
Saturday, 2 October 1999

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No matter how much this match was distorted by the thoroughly bothersome and ill-judged refereeing of Rob Harris, the stark reality was that both these teams served up football that lacked guile, dynamic, intelligence and, above all, entertainment. Small wonder that Premiership crowds are decreasing.

The assertion that foreign players have lifted the standard of the game in England now seems set in stone but watching this ragbag of a Liverpool team, which appears to lack the basic order out of which freedom and self-creation can be discovered and released, it is easy to see that the passion, for good or bad, is steadily being leached away.

Phil Thompson, Liverpool’s assistant manager, was the only member of the club, on the field or the bench, to display any animation. It is doubtful if many of the players took a blind bit of notice of it. Most, in all probability, do not understand him.

The previous manager Roy Evans allowed player power to dictate matters at Anfield. Gérard Houllier has responded by breaking up the team and filling it with essentially cheap options. He said afterwards he had learned, in this match and in the derby against Everton, that his side possessed “great heart and resilience”. Imagine the long and baleful look Bill Shankly would have given anybody who had dared suggest otherwise about his team.

With four players sent off in the last couple of weeks, albeit Staunton’s dismissal on Saturday a gross injustice, Houllier must impose discipline; not all Mr Harris’s yellow cards for Liverpool, eight in total (two for Staunton), were misplaced.

Houllier is having to call up players who are essentially half fit, Hamann being the most obvious example, in the belief that his side will gel again, although those early wins over Arsenal and Leeds now seem little more than false dawns.

Patience is the key word at Anfield but, Sami Hyypia apart, there was little quality or form in this performance.

The Villa manager, John Gregory, seized on the post-match refereeing debate (Harris has issued 27 yellow cards in three matches) and described Staunton’s sending-off as “outrageous”. This, no doubt, helped to deflect too much debate on the glaring inadequacies of his team’s performance.

Houllier, rather quaintly, used the word “daring” to describe the decision to keep Michael Owen and Erik Meijer upfront after Staunton had been sent off on the half-hour; Gregory, however, appeared to have missed this leap into adventure: “We still had to break down two lots of four in midfield and defence.”

No goals, no excitement, 11 yellow cards. In the end nothing added up.

No matter how much this match was distorted by the thoroughly bothersome and ill-judged refereeing of Rob Harris, the stark reality was that both these teams served up football that lacked guile, dynamic, intelligence and, above all, entertainment. Small wonder that Premiership crowds are decreasing.

The assertion that foreign players have lifted the standard of the game in England now seems set in stone but watching this ragbag of a Liverpool team, which appears to lack the basic order out of which freedom and self-creation can be discovered and released, it is easy to see that the passion, for good or bad, is steadily being leached away.

Phil Thompson, Liverpool’s assistant manager, was the only member of the club, on the field or the bench, to display any animation. It is doubtful if many of the players took a blind bit of notice of it. Most, in all probability, do not understand him.

The previous manager Roy Evans allowed player power to dictate matters at Anfield. Gérard Houllier has responded by breaking up the team and filling it with essentially cheap options. He said afterwards he had learned, in this match and in the derby against Everton, that his side possessed “great heart and resilience”. Imagine the long and baleful look Bill Shankly would have given anybody who had dared suggest otherwise about his team.

With four players sent off in the last couple of weeks, albeit Staunton’s dismissal on Saturday a gross injustice, Houllier must impose discipline; not all Mr Harris’s yellow cards for Liverpool, eight in total (two for Staunton), were misplaced.

Houllier is having to call up players who are essentially half fit, Hamann being the most obvious example, in the belief that his side will gel again, although those early wins over Arsenal and Leeds now seem little more than false dawns.

Patience is the key word at Anfield but, Sami Hyypia apart, there was little quality or form in this performance.

The Villa manager, John Gregory, seized on the post-match refereeing debate (Harris has issued 27 yellow cards in three matches) and described Staunton’s sending-off as “outrageous”. This, no doubt, helped to deflect too much debate on the glaring inadequacies of his team’s performance.

Houllier, rather quaintly, used the word “daring” to describe the decision to keep Michael Owen and Erik Meijer upfront after Staunton had been sent off on the half-hour; Gregory, however, appeared to have missed this leap into adventure: “We still had to break down two lots of four in midfield and defence.”

No goals, no excitement, 11 yellow cards. In the end nothing added up.