Game #4642

1999-00

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Position:

Semi Final

League Cup Semi Final

Leicester City

Filbert Street

Attendance: 21,843

Wednesday, 2 February 2000

Villa are knocked out of the League Cup in the semi finals as they are beaten by Leicester's rudimentary approach to the game.

Leicester City

1-0

Aston Villa

Scorer(s) | None |

Assist(s) | None

AT A GLANCE

Game #4642

Season | 1999-00 |
Matchday | #34 |
Manager Game | #91 |
Wednesday, 2 February 2000

MATCH SUMMARY

Manager | John Gregory |
Referee | Paul Durkin, Dorset |
FT Result | Lost |
FT Score | 0-1 |
Last 5 Games | DDDWL |

MATCH OFFICIALS

Referee: Paul Durkin

MATCH INCIDENTS

Paul Durkin

Villa

None

Leicester City

🟨 |

🟨 | Booking
🟥 | Sending off
💥+ | Incidents e.g. penalty awarded

💥- | Incidents e.g. penalty conceded, goal disallowed

💥 | Incidents e.g. refused clear pen

🆘 | Notably poor refereeing performance    

TEAM STATS

Starting XI Average Age
| 26.53 |

Oldest Player |
M Paul Merson | 31.89 |

Youngest Player |
M Gareth Barry | 18.95 |

TEAM NEWS

Richard Walker comes in for his first start of the season in place of Benito Carbone.

UNAVAILABLE

Not recorded

MATCH STATS

Not recorded

MANAGER

John Gregory

STAFF

Assistant Manager: John Deehan

STARTING LINE UP

GK David James |
FB Steve Watson |
LB Alan Wright |
CB Ugo Ehiogu |
CB Gareth Southgate |
M Paul Merson |
M Steve Stone |
M George Boateng |
M Gareth Barry |
F Julian Joachim |
F Richard Walker |

SUBSTITUTES

FB Mark Delaney for FB Steve Watson | 37’ |
M Ian Taylor for F Richard Walker | 60’ |
M Lee Hendrie for FB Mark Delaney | 82’ |

UNUSED SUBSTITUTES

CB Colin Calderwood
GK Neil Cutler

THE OPPOSITION

Flowers, Gilchrist, Sinclair, Taggart, Elliott (g), Izzett (Campbell), Lennon (Zagorakis), Savage, Guppy (Impey), Oakes, Heskey (ex). Manager: Martin O’Neill.

ex: Also played for the Villa

g: Scored

s/o: Sent off

s-: Sub off; s+: Sub on

ON THIS DAY

Future Villa boss Martin O'Neill masterminds an obdurate and workmanlike Leicester's latest victory over Villa to rob them of a League Cup final spot.

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MATCH TIMELINE

37’ Sub off, Steve Watson, Sub on, Mark Delaney
45’ Goal, 0-1, (Leicester City)
HT Leicester City 1-0 Aston Villa
60’ Sub off, Richard Walker, Sub on, Ian Taylor
82’ Sub off, Mark Delaney, Sub on, Lee Hendrie
FT Leicester City 1-0 Aston Villa

MANAGER WATCH

POSITION

2021-22 Matchweek 38.jpg

MATCH PROGRAMME

MATCH PROGRAMME

Quotation Marks.png

QUOTES

Villa Boy.png

Quotation Marks.png

*The Guardian*
Thursday, 3 February 2000

"A towering header from the stand-in striker Matt Elliott in first-half stoppage time steered Leicester to a Wembley date with Tranmere Rovers."

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With a delicious sense of timing, Leicester City delivered the perfect riposte to their detractors and dispelled a few myths along the way. A towering header from the stand-in striker Matt Elliott in first-half stoppage time steered Leicester to a Wembley date with Tranmere Rovers and the prospect of a seventh appearance beneath the twin towers in eight years.

They may have been written off in some quarters, but Martin O’Neill’s gallant side just love upsetting their illustrious counterparts. Last night they produced a performance of industry, endeavour and, yes, no shortage of skill.

Villa arrived with something of an inferiority complex, having failed to beat their Midlands neighbours in 12 years. They also faced the added challenge posed by a Leicester side bristling with fierce indignation, following an acrimonious bout of mud slinging between O’Neill and an anti-Leicester faction boasting Ken Bates and Arséne Wenger among its honorary members.

John Gregory is surely up for election himself after some of his barbed remarks about Leicester’s much-criticised defensive methods during the scoreless first leg at Villa Park a week earlier. However, those acquainted with Leicester know only too well that they are never better than at times of adversity.

As is his wont, O’Neill could not resist taking a few more pot shots at his detractors in his programme notes, and his players exuded a stubborn air of defiance in obliging Gregory’s wish that “they would actually cross the halfway line”.

Leicester’s critics were almost made to eat their words early in a one-sided opening half, only for Emile Heskey to shoot straight at David James after being given a clear sight of goal thanks to Gareth Barry’s mistake.

James then followed up his colleague’s faux pas with one of his own that came close to presenting Robbie Savage with an open goal. Villa’s jitters were becoming increasingly evident as they struggled to suppress the usual succession of rampaging bursts from a bullish Heskey.

When Stefan Oakes arrowed a venomous left-foot drive that beat James all ends up - only to ricochet back into play off the goalkeeper’s right-hand post - Leicester could have been excused for suspecting that fate was against them.

But the home side did not have to wait long. In virtually the last move of the half Savage swung over a right-wing delivery for Elliott to head beyond James, despite the close proximity of Ugo Ehiogu.

Leicester’s goalkeeper Tim Flowers, in stark contrast to James, was a virtual spectator apart from sporadic flurries in the second half. The home supporters were determined to milk the moment with chants of “boring, boring Villa”, and there was more than a hint of sarcasm when Leicester’s half-time summariser and occasional jester Alan Birchenall exclaimed he had been almost “sent to sleep” by the events of the opening period.

But whether the club’s bank manager was so chuffed by the side’s survival in this competition was another matter. Leicester have reached a provisional agreement with Liverpool to sell Heskey for £7 million at the end of the season, but the Merseyside club have made it clear during fresh negotiations that they are willing to increase the transfer fee to push the deal through early once the player is free of cup involvement.

Thanks to the events of last night, that will not be the case until after February 27 - when Leicester and Tranmere do battle for a slice of Wembley glory.

With a delicious sense of timing, Leicester City delivered the perfect riposte to their detractors and dispelled a few myths along the way. A towering header from the stand-in striker Matt Elliott in first-half stoppage time steered Leicester to a Wembley date with Tranmere Rovers and the prospect of a seventh appearance beneath the twin towers in eight years.

They may have been written off in some quarters, but Martin O’Neill’s gallant side just love upsetting their illustrious counterparts. Last night they produced a performance of industry, endeavour and, yes, no shortage of skill.

Villa arrived with something of an inferiority complex, having failed to beat their Midlands neighbours in 12 years. They also faced the added challenge posed by a Leicester side bristling with fierce indignation, following an acrimonious bout of mud slinging between O’Neill and an anti-Leicester faction boasting Ken Bates and Arséne Wenger among its honorary members.

John Gregory is surely up for election himself after some of his barbed remarks about Leicester’s much-criticised defensive methods during the scoreless first leg at Villa Park a week earlier. However, those acquainted with Leicester know only too well that they are never better than at times of adversity.

As is his wont, O’Neill could not resist taking a few more pot shots at his detractors in his programme notes, and his players exuded a stubborn air of defiance in obliging Gregory’s wish that “they would actually cross the halfway line”.

Leicester’s critics were almost made to eat their words early in a one-sided opening half, only for Emile Heskey to shoot straight at David James after being given a clear sight of goal thanks to Gareth Barry’s mistake.

James then followed up his colleague’s faux pas with one of his own that came close to presenting Robbie Savage with an open goal. Villa’s jitters were becoming increasingly evident as they struggled to suppress the usual succession of rampaging bursts from a bullish Heskey.

When Stefan Oakes arrowed a venomous left-foot drive that beat James all ends up - only to ricochet back into play off the goalkeeper’s right-hand post - Leicester could have been excused for suspecting that fate was against them.

But the home side did not have to wait long. In virtually the last move of the half Savage swung over a right-wing delivery for Elliott to head beyond James, despite the close proximity of Ugo Ehiogu.

Leicester’s goalkeeper Tim Flowers, in stark contrast to James, was a virtual spectator apart from sporadic flurries in the second half. The home supporters were determined to milk the moment with chants of “boring, boring Villa”, and there was more than a hint of sarcasm when Leicester’s half-time summariser and occasional jester Alan Birchenall exclaimed he had been almost “sent to sleep” by the events of the opening period.

But whether the club’s bank manager was so chuffed by the side’s survival in this competition was another matter. Leicester have reached a provisional agreement with Liverpool to sell Heskey for £7 million at the end of the season, but the Merseyside club have made it clear during fresh negotiations that they are willing to increase the transfer fee to push the deal through early once the player is free of cup involvement.

Thanks to the events of last night, that will not be the case until after February 27 - when Leicester and Tranmere do battle for a slice of Wembley glory.